ZAMBIA: DRC refugee influx

 Zambia
 Emergency Response
 9th Apr 2018

Overview

The humanitarian situation in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) deteriorated dramatically in 2017, and the country is now facing a complex and protracted crisis of massive proportions. The number of people in need of assistance almost doubled in 2017 and is expected to increase in 2018.

Violence has been intensifying in DRC with dire consequences for the country and surrounding region. While more than 4.25 million Congolese are displaced inside the country, according to the UNHCR, more than 515,200 have fled into neighbouring countries, including Zambia.


The Need

Since September 2017, more than 15,000 refugees from DRC have been registered at the Kenani Transit Centre in Luapula Province. Most arrivals in recent months are fleeing violence in the Congolese provinces of Haute Katanga and Tanganyika. Of these, roughly 60 percent are under 17 years of age. The Kenani Transit Centre is now full and Zambian authorities are currently relocating all refugees at Kenani to the newly established Mantapala refugee settlement, also in Luapula Province. As of 23 February, the settlement at Mantapala houses over 900 relocated refugees.

The priority needs for all refugees right now are food, clean water, sanitation and soap, shelter materials and building support, medical services and treatment, protection from sexual and domestic violence, safe spaces for children, women and vulnerable people, and psychosocial counselling for trauma, among other needs.


What is CARE Doing?

CARE has established a Coordinated Response Centre for survivors of sexual and gender based violence at the Kenani Transit Centre. At the Mantapala Refugee Settlement, CARE is working with the community to construct 2,500 transitional shelters. We have trained 30 shelter agents, volunteers from both the refugee and the host communities, to assist with construction. Six shelter agents are providing technical support and the remaining 24 are constructing shelters for people with special needs.

 


Caption: Kasonta and her family stand in front of their new shelter at Mantapala settlement in Zambia. CARE, in partnership with UNHCR, is building 2,500 transitional shelters for refugees fleeing violence in DR Congo. We have trained 30 shelter agents, volunteers from both the refugee and the host communities, to assist with construction. Six shelter agents are providing technical support and the remaining 24 are constructing shelters for people with special needs.


For more of our work in Zambia: click here.

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