A tent she calls home: A photo essay of IDPs in Yemen

 Yemen
 Emergency ResponseWater Sanitation & Hygiene,
 1st Oct 2019

Almost five years of war in Yemen have created the world’s worst humanitarian crisis, with 24 million people – 80% of the population – in need of humanitarian assistance. As well as economic collapse that has destroyed the livelihoods of millions, the fighting has created an internal displacement crisis. A total of 3.6 million people are displaced within Yemen, many of them having fled more than once to escape heavy fighting.

The needs of internally displaced people (IDPs) are numerous. With humanitarian funding from the EU, CARE is reaching some of the most vulnerable people in Mawasit district of Taiz governorate, providing lifesaving assistance including cash, water, hygiene kits and cooking items to conflict-affected displaced families. The project is also helping host communities who are struggling to accommodate such large numbers of displaced.

Photo credits: Mahmood Fadhl

A displaced Yemeni girl surrounded by teddy bears in the tent she and her family now call home. Her family is receiving monthly cash payments enabling them to meet their basic needs.  

 

The children of one of the beneficiaries of the progamme CARE carries out with EU support are studying in their home. The conflict has created a generation of young Yemenis who are not educated. 2 million children are estimated to be out of school.

 

A girl fills a bottle with clean water from the water tank constructed by CARE.

 

The girl and her mother secure jerry cans filled with clean water to their donkey, in order to transport them to their home.  

 

A woman brings water provided by CARE to the basic shelter she is living in with her family.

 

A displaced mother and her five children sit outside their tent. Thanks to EU support, CARE provides displaced families with cash to buy the essentials they need to survive.

 

People fill their jerry cans with clean water from the water tank constructed by CARE with EU support. Building water tanks is a sustainable way to improve lives and help control the spread of waterborne diseases like cholera.

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